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Author Topic: A Grand Tour of the Political Parties  (Read 18509 times)

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Bowden Guy

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Re: A Grand Tour of the Political Parties
« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2015, 05:54:21 PM »
All of the Governent's shares in the UK banks that have been sold on the market have (so far) been at a profit. Taking such large stakes in RBS and Lloyds could yet turn out to be Brown's greatest master stroke.

tigerman

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Re: A Grand Tour of the Political Parties
« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2015, 04:07:43 PM »
Average incomes in real terms are certainly down since 2010, but personal debt is once again on the rise. The government is reliant on another debt-fuelled recovery to save its ass, which is exactly what we don't need. Very little has been achieved, except a delayed recovery and shedloads of money delivered straight back to the banks.

Duke Fame

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Re: A Grand Tour of the Political Parties
« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2015, 03:57:29 PM »
Those are more neoliberal than Liberal, and worryingly remniscent of the lax financial regulation that led to the global financial crisis that started in 2007, and whose legacy is still with us, of course. 

Neo liberal, classical liberal the constant is Liberal. It's pretty much bang on as Orange book liberal to me which is the best current form of liberalism.



No it hasn't.  See http://themoneycharity.org.uk/media/December-2014-Money-Statistics-summary.pdf

That's a pretty meaningless link. Average Personal Debt / Average income has fallen since 2010.

Dave

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Re: A Grand Tour of the Political Parties
« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2015, 03:29:18 PM »
Same sex marriages

OK, I guess that's Liberal.

Freeing up the market from state interference
The use of markets rather than quantitative regulations
Proper acceptance of free trade, economic liberalism, limited government and individualism

Those are more neoliberal than Liberal, and worryingly remniscent of the lax financial regulation that led to the global financial crisis that started in 2007, and whose legacy is still with us, of course. 

Private debt has fallen

No it hasn't.  See http://themoneycharity.org.uk/media/December-2014-Money-Statistics-summary.pdf

Blocking of the renewal of the wasteful trident

Last I heard it was still heading for replacement.  The government has kicked the can down the road, and deferred a decision until 2016. 

It's actually quite surprising how much of the coalition agreement was delivered. 

Agreed.  And despite my scepticism over some aspects, I agree that the present government has had some successes.  Not deficit reduction, of course - that has largely failed - but we do at last have some sort of economic recovery, while other developed countries are still struggling.   And one of the things I admire about this government has been its readiness to take on vested interests in areas which Tories have traditionally protected, such as the police and the armed forces. 

However, they have made a number of mistakes too, and they will pay the price for these on 7 May.  Take the NHS: all the reports into the current crisis at several hospitals show that one of the chief causes is so-called bed blocking, and I can bear this out from our own experience with an elderly relative, as it happens. Urgent cases can't be treated, because the hospitals are full of elderly patients who are ready for discharge but can't be sent home because Eric Pickles' brutal cuts to local authority funding have wrecked social services.  They should have seen that coming but they didn't.

Another big blunder was David Cameron's 'no ifs, no buts' promise to reduce net immigration to below 100K per year.  He should have had the wit to realise that as long as we are in the EU, that is completely unachievable.  But he didnt, and is now paying the price. 

It is often the case that governments get thrown out not because voters disagree with their policies, but simply because they are incompetent.  I'm expecting the same to happen in five months time. 

Duke Fame

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Re: A Grand Tour of the Political Parties
« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2015, 12:01:33 PM »
Equal marriage
Blocking of the renewal of the wasteful trident

Neither would have been achieved without the coalition if you looking for a LIBERAL influence quite apart from none Liberal issue such as the increased pupil premium, increase funding for cycling and much more

It's actually quite surprising how much of the coalition agreement was delivered.

The political village is pretty surprised how together the actual MP's have been. I know two civil servants who work in westminster and both have said relations are not only better than the Blair / Brown feud but also that of the major and Thatcher govts (although the thatcher days are heresay)

wheels

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Re: A Grand Tour of the Political Parties
« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2015, 11:35:43 AM »
Equal marriage
Blocking of the renewal of the wasteful trident

Neither would have been achieved without the coalition if you looking for a LIBERAL influence quite apart from none Liberal issue such as the increased pupil premium, increase funding for cycling and much more

Duke Fame

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Re: A Grand Tour of the Political Parties
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2015, 11:22:40 AM »
Liberal? In what way?

I don't mean the nanny state liberalism of the 90's and 00's I mean:

Same sex marriages
Freeing up the market from state interference
The use of markets rather than quantitative regulations
Proper acceptance of free trade, economic liberalism, limited government and individualism

Or to put it another way, Pollyanna, we're in yet another debt-fuelled boom built on inflated property values. And business confidence is not up, it's down.  See http://www.tradingeconomics.com/united-kingdom/business-confidence

Private debt has fallen, the state debt is a worry but the critisism from the left has been that the reason why we're not already back in a boom is that the coalition haven't spent enough and logically have not put us into more debt. The left are good at this, they say spend money and it it doesn't work, you get Balls telling everyone 'We told you to spend more'.

What we have is a move to focus on long-term sustainable growth. Moreover, the emphais is to improve the capabilities of the work force and create an environment for innovation.

Dave

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Re: A Grand Tour of the Political Parties
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2015, 11:00:10 AM »
It's certainly true that the coalition, although Tory led, has been very Liberal.

Liberal? In what way?

Nevertheless, they have been very effective in putting the economy on a more even keel, business is sustainable and confidence is up.

Or to put it another way, Pollyanna, we're in yet another debt-fuelled boom built on inflated property values. And business confidence is not up, it's down.  See http://www.tradingeconomics.com/united-kingdom/business-confidence


Duke Fame

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A Grand Tour of the Political Parties
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2015, 08:15:46 AM »
Anyone else received the ludicrous letter of support for Lisa Smart from the current incumbent? "Over the last few years I have seen the Conservatives coming forward with more and more extreme ideas...". Priceless. Should've gone to SpecSavers in 2010, Sir Andrew!

It's certainly true that the coalition, although Tory led, has been very Liberal. Perhaps Stunnel is claiming the lib dems have kept the tories in check and that is what Andrew is claiming credit for.

Nevertheless, they have been very effective in putting the economy on a more even keel, business is sustainable and confidence is up.

Is be happy with a lib dem / Tory coalition again.