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Author Topic: Ramblers:The Curious Incident of the Dog Wanting a Good Time.  (Read 2378 times)

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amazon

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Re: Ramblers:The Curious Incident of the Dog Wanting a Good Time.
« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2015, 08:10:03 PM »
Some postings are worth more than 1 per week - lovely photos!
You should buy that pig . And allso write a book someone out there will publish for you come on have a go .

Reddish vale collage will look after the pig .at there place ask them .

Barbara

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Re: Ramblers:The Curious Incident of the Dog Wanting a Good Time.
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2015, 07:47:59 PM »
Some postings are worth more than 1 per week - lovely photos!


marplerambler

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Ramblers:The Curious Incident of the Dog Wanting a Good Time.
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2015, 05:34:26 PM »
Yes I know Mr Webmaster that one submission a week is quite enough but just let me sneak in my favourite write up and photos from a few week ago and I promise I will not submit more than one a week from now on

Manchester Coach Rambles Group trip to Cartmel on Sunday 1st February 2015.

The Curious Incident of the Dog Wanting a Good Time.
If the blizzards three days before the Manchester Coach Ramblers Group outing  had persisted, our trip to Cartmel, a small village a couple of miles away from Grange over Sands in Cumbria may have been cancelled, but in fact, the weather was extremely kind to us and we had a cold, crisp sunny day. The snow had melted though the ground was frozen in Cartmel and just the spectacular views of the snow-covered  Southern Lakeland Fells and the Howgills alone would have made the trip worthwhile.
We were , however, to get a great deal more from our walk than we had bargained for, including  an introduction to of an Oxfordshire Sandy and Black pig at a farm near to Lindale and the company of a unflappable sheepdog  for seven or eight miles.
I have seen pigs before and to be very honest, a pig is a pig and they have never caught my attention but this creature, brown with black spots, was truly a magnificent sight to behold. Also known as the “Plum Pudding or Oxford Forest Pig” this is one of the oldest British pig breeds which, we were told by the proud farmer exhibiting his prize possessions to our group of nosy walkers, has existed since the Middles Ages, very nearly became extinct in the twentieth century but he and a number of other enthusiasts are ensuring that these creatures don’t vanish from the face of the planet.
The sheepdog, however, was making no attempts to vanish!  Although encouraged for a few minutes, by the time we had been walking for two or three hours she had decided to become a permanent unwanted fixture attached to the group. Try as we might to block her progress, six foot high walls presented no problems and once or twice we thought we had foiled her with gates worthy of Strangeways but she seemed to sit, scratch her head, fly off at a tangent and lo and behold she would reappear a few minutes later. Another walking group lovingly stroked her when they passed during our afternoon coffee break and we smiled knowingly at each other: she had found a surrogate group and off she went. Our relief was to be short lived: a mile up the path she re-appeared to prompt such soul searching questions as ‘Do you ring 999 or 111 to dispose of a canine hijacker?’ from a couple of, by now, panic-stricken members of the group who were to be answered by a member who had just experienced a miraculous revelation that she must have the gift of canine telepathy to tell us that ‘She looks like a Molly – no she is definitely called Molly!’ and behold the dog was gone as if she had never existed. The dog may have been laughing at our ineffectual attempts to get rid of her all day but the moment she discovered we had someone who could read her mind and discover her sordid history as a stowaway she must have fled as fast as her legs could carry her and we could descend to the pub in Cartmel for a well-deserved drink unencumbered by a dog that probably hitchhikes a lift from every walking group passing its farm.
Pardon? A description of the walk you say?  Well, pictures tell a thousand words so I hope that you enjoy the photographs.



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