To advertise on this site

Brabyns Preparatory School -Nurture. Engage. Achieve.

Author Topic: Marple Hall School  (Read 13360 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

hollins

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 225
Re: Marple Hall School
« Reply #51 on: May 08, 2013, 04:05:58 PM »
Marple Hall School has a new Headmaster for September: Mr Barker (currently Deputy Head).

Miss Marple

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1397
Re: Marple Hall School
« Reply #50 on: March 22, 2012, 07:26:50 PM »
Off topic post removed by Howard
BECAUSE IT CONCERNS ME, MINE AND OTHERS !!!!!

Dave

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2414
Re: Marple Hall School
« Reply #49 on: March 22, 2012, 09:53:46 AM »
Hey Dave I might consider being a Governour !  So what  are these so called qualities one must have  ;)

Being able to spell 'governor'   ;)

Lisa Oldham

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 581
Re: Marple Hall School
« Reply #48 on: March 21, 2012, 09:31:49 PM »
Oh I loved Mr Saville! He knew the name of every child in the school and would make sure each and every one of us knew!  and he forgave me falling asleep in his law class! :D  His punishments were harsh ( not to me I might add!!) but he was consistent, very visible and terrifying!  Can't think of  one teacher my son "worries" about upsetting..though he likes lots of them. My daughter is still a little nervous being relatively young and well behaved but even she is now questioning the teachers and pushing the boundaries in a way I would never have considered.  Don't think its Marple Hall in particular, just the way society/we bring our kids up now, media influence and the fact the schools hands are tied over so many small but significant issues.

Miss Marple

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1397
Re: Marple Hall School
« Reply #47 on: March 21, 2012, 08:21:07 PM »
Bring back Mr Saville !  Happy Days !
BECAUSE IT CONCERNS ME, MINE AND OTHERS !!!!!

Heritage

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 152
Re: Marple Hall School
« Reply #46 on: March 21, 2012, 07:15:56 PM »
Sounds like The Giffer needs to get his / her sleeves rolled up and pitch into changing the culture from inside the tent. The qualities required of any decent Governor are primarily around a passion for excellence and a halfway decent ability to speak plainly. The Giffer's postings hint at having just those qualities but if I were you I'd channel them into a Governor position y'self.....

Miss Marple

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1397
Re: Marple Hall School
« Reply #45 on: March 21, 2012, 07:00:27 PM »
Hey Dave I might consider being a Governour !  So what  are these so called qualities one must have  ;)
BECAUSE IT CONCERNS ME, MINE AND OTHERS !!!!!

Dave

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2414
Re: Marple Hall School
« Reply #44 on: March 21, 2012, 03:51:24 PM »
Sorry Dave/Hollins but can't agree with your defence of the Heads low profile....I think the idea of periodically going to the canteen and speaking to the kids is a splendid one

Maybe you're right, as long as it is only 'periodically'.   We pay headteachers quite a decent salary (some get more than 100K, I think, though I have no idea what this head gets), and for that money I think we should expect them to focus primarily on strategic issues, rather than having a nice sociable time chatting with the kids! 

Re Governors - in [nearly]   three years not one has ever presented themselves to me or communicated in anyway about what they do or what contribution they make .  At least i get Councillors and wannabee councillors visiting every May

Councillors are seeking your vote, Giffer, that why they call on you. We had one knocking the door the other day - first time for ages - I wonder why   ;D  The nearest equivalent on school governing bodies are parent governors, who ought to issue a statement of what they stand for when they stand for election.  But it isn't the business of other school governors to go round individually 'presenting' themselves.  They are appointed, not elected, and their responsibilities are to the school, not to parents.  And if you feel you don't have the qualities required to be a school governor, maybe you should be a bit more generous in acknowledging the efforts of those who do have those qualities? 

The Giffer

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 18
Re: Marple Hall School
« Reply #43 on: March 13, 2012, 07:50:07 PM »
Sorry Dave/Hollins but can't agree with your defence of the Heads low profile - She is not  a  " mere " Manager  - She is the Chief Executive [CEO]  She employs other Middle/Senior Managers to manage day to day activity [ i assume ] - The CEO requires presence not so they can sit in their office all day . In my view the Chief Executives job is to take time out and regularly engage with both employees and in a Heads case - the children - Not every one of course individually  but using processes that allow some form of interaction and feedback - I think the idea of periodically going to the canteen and speaking to the kids is a splendid one .I'll pass it on.

Re Governors - my comment is entirely justified in my opinion .They are the schools equivalent of the  board and in [nearly]   three years not one has ever presented themselves to me or communicated in anyway about what they do or what contribution they make . 
At least i get Councillors and wannabee councillors visiting every May [although interestingly  some of the Governors are also Councillors - read into how you wish  ]
As for standing for Parent Governor myself  not sure i have the qualities required . :D

The Giffer

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 18
Re: Marple Hall School
« Reply #42 on: March 13, 2012, 07:20:12 PM »
A couple of points Giffer, if the teachers aren't pushing your kids, shouldn't you help them to excel.

In the issue of teaching rugby, rugger is favoured because football tends to expose talent and athleticism. Rugby tends to be for fat kids who weren't good enough to play football and tends to be more inclusive.
 
 I am very aware  of my responsibilities - I try my best but i also  have clear expectations of what teachers  should provide - and as you can probably conclude in my opinion there are some who are " coasting " in respect of their duties and responsibilities.

Duke Fame

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1638
Re: Marple Hall School
« Reply #41 on: March 13, 2012, 05:17:55 PM »
In the issue of teaching rugby, rugger is favoured because football tends to expose talent and athleticism. Rugby tends to be for fat kids who weren't good enough to play football and tends to be more inclusive.

Although I'd disagree with the "tends to be for fat kids" remark, your definition of it as inclusive is spot on. There's a position for anyone in rugby whether you're big (front row) tall (second row), small & nippy (scrum half) or just average (everyone else).

I've coached children from six to thirteen at Marple Rugby Club for the past six years and everyone is taught respect and discipline which is vital for a team game. Everyone gets a game and the prime reason for playing is to have fun. In my experience, if you're not a reasonably natural athlete, even in local clubs, in football you have little chance of a regular game.


I don't think it's anymore likely to teach kids respect for others than football but because football is so much more competetive, it's likely that a good few of the lads will already be head and shoulders ahead of the others in terms of ability. We have to remember that rugby was indeed invented by William Webb Ellis because he wasn't as good as his peers so whilst stood with his hands down his shorts, when the ball was passed towards him, he panicked and picked up the ball and hey presto, Rugby was invented and fat rotund fellas within the comonwealth and France had something to do whilst the real sportsmen got on and played football.

In my school we played Rugger and Football at school, if the footbll teams didn't have a game, we (the football team) played rugger and invarably won. When the football team had a match which clashed with Rugby, the rugger team tended to lose.

Pink Panther

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 585
Re: Marple Hall School
« Reply #40 on: March 13, 2012, 11:00:17 AM »
Its a big school, but the years are split into houses.  its nearly 2 years since my son did his GCSE's at Marple hall, but the teachers were fully suportive of my son, with a constant supply of phone calls or emails to me  because the "boy thing " Dave talks about, isnt exclusive to Daves  family :) . .... the minimum two hours combined homework, we may have reached one hour in our house, although his teachers would tell me something very different at parents evening  ( the hamster my son drew in five minutes over his breakfast for Art homework, when pulled up for scribbling his work, my son explained that it was a rough haired hamster  ... and subsequently got an apology!  )

My son really enjoyed his time at Marple Hall, and loved many of his teachers, but I must admit, although he wasnt a trouble causer, he did get away with murder when it came to banter with his teachers .
I'm not up to no good, it only looks as though I am!     8)

hollins

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 225
Re: Marple Hall School
« Reply #39 on: March 13, 2012, 09:53:08 AM »
I agree with Dave - when the school has nearly 1500 pupils over 5 years, and is probably one of the two biggest single employers in Marple, then the headmistress has to be primarily a manager and isn't going to be having much day-to-day contact with pupils. The governors got mentioned in the Ofsted report: I'm sure they will take note.

I have one daughter who has finished and gone on to CAMSFC and another daughter in year 10. They have done well and been very happy at the school: I think any child going there with a positive attitude and supportive parents would do the same. Three areas stand out as being particularly well taught: mathematics, science and languages, but I think all the subject teachers did the best they could with the current GCSE curriculum. Neither child experienced any form of bullying whatsoever.

I would encourage you to keep an eye on the school's website - they keep fairly well up to date with school news and activities. They are also getting involved with a "Vision For Marple".

As for rugby - well, it's a brilliant sport (ask Howard!). However, according to the school's prize lists they seem to have county representatives in many other sports, including many that I never got a chance to play at a much smaller school.

Dave

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2414
Re: Marple Hall School
« Reply #38 on: March 13, 2012, 09:21:50 AM »
Perhaps the school is simply too big .....The Head appears very distant and i am told has very little interaction with the pupils .

I think you'll find those two facts are inextricably linked.  It's a massive school, and now Offerton has closed it's getting even bigger!.  The person running it has to prioritise her time ruthlessly.  It always goes down well with parents if head teachers are seen chatting with pupils in the dinner queue, but to be honest, it is not the best use of their scarce time.  For example, interaction with teaching staff is more important, in my experience. 

The Board of Governors are simply non existant .

That's a bit harsh.  Exactly what do you expect of them, Giffer?  School governors are public spirited people who generously give up their time and contribute their expertise for the good of the community.  Mrs Dave was a governor at MHS for several years, and was constantly going to meetings, attending events, and serving on panels dealing with staff and pupil disciplinary matters etc.  If you think you can do better, then why not stand as a parent governor? 

I think overall my son has made reasonable progress and appears fairly content  but i never the get the impression he is pushed to excel - if he is to be believed - and i have no reason to doubt him he gets approx 2 hours  a week  combined subjects set homework maximum 

Don't worry about this - it's called being male  ;)  We had two sons through the school, and they were both just like that - doing the minimum necessary for a quiet life!  But it passed, and they went on to do well at GCSE and A level, and subsequently at university. 

Duke Fame

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1638
Re: Marple Hall School
« Reply #37 on: March 13, 2012, 07:38:13 AM »
A couple of points Giffer, if the teachers aren't pushing your kids, shouldn't you help them to excel.

In the issue of teaching rugby, rugger is favoured because football tends to expose talent and athleticism. Rugby tends to be for fat kids who weren't good enough to play football and tends to be more inclusive.