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Kumon Centre Romiley Maths and English Study Programmes

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Author Topic: Marple Hall School  (Read 9648 times)
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JMC
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« Reply #30 on: March 03, 2012, 11:10:32 PM »

I have two children there at the moment. I also went myself many years ago!

My kids are very happy there, any bullying issues were sorted out. Only thing we had a problem with was form allocation for one (all other kids from primary together with friends and my child with no friends but with someone who they were bullied by previously-MH wouldn't change forms and said 'there are plenty of others who will have your place'-charming!) but as time went on they settled after a rough start.

I find teaching is good and my children both enjoy going. They do push them to succeed and there are loads of good extra curricular clubs to join. The house system is a good idea and having a specified house pastoral manager makes liasing with school easier since it is such a big school. They seem to be tackling disruptive behaviours and have a Waterloo RD style 'cooler' for persistant offenders, so I am told! Overall, behaviour seems very good when I have been in the school with most kids very polite etc. I would recommend the school and overall have mostly very good experiences.

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Pink Panther
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« Reply #31 on: March 04, 2012, 12:14:28 PM »

My son left 2 years ago nearly, we were very pleased with Marple Hall.  I attended an independent school , which is tiny in comparison, I dreaded my son going to Marple Hall as its so big ,  but I needn't have worried, the school years  are  split into houses , my son got fantastic results in his GCSE's, although this was not without nagging from his teachers !   Grin

He is now at the Ridge , and doing very well there Smiley
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Lisa Oldham
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« Reply #32 on: March 06, 2012, 11:01:28 AM »

Ive got 3 kids there at moment.

At times its been great.. no problems at all.. at times its been horrendous!

Teaching for my eldest when he got there was fantastic, amazing incredible.  Marple hall has THE best Maths teacher that ever walked this earth in my opinion! Teaching for my next child initially was awful,  both in Maths and English. ( maths teacher who taught maths in german!!) Teaching for my newest one there is ok.. no complaints. generally good all round!

I prefer the old head to the new, as do all the children I've talked to. The new one seems to be less visible than the last!

General behaviour I think considering the wide catchment area for the school is very good. I think it highly unlikely that you will find a local school that takes such a range of children from so many different backgrounds.  I've heard of several bullying problems over several years where the school haven't dealt with it very well and the children being bullied have moved school, which i think is sad.  However i also think its really hard for any school to deal with serious bullying problems nowadays so i guess this would be the same anywhere you go. 


I find the worst thing about the school is the uniform policy.  Its not consistent at all  They tell girls off and give out detentions if they don't wear white underwear but let them walk around with skirts that show their knickers and painted like they're out on the town! This is clearly outside school... but inside as well. A lot of the lads look slovenly.. including my son who i think is possibly the worst looking child in the school and is never pulled up about it( if you see a 6ft 3 VERY long haired crumpled looking lad hes mine!) . I pull him up.. i send him looking "ok" but whats the use of me trying if the school don't back me up.  And yes I know its where kids "rebel" but wearing just a belt(girls) at the age of 12 is a bit too much!

If i had my time again to choose a different school... hmmm tough one! I might..for my eldest.. but then his obscene love of maths comes from that fantastic teacher! I wouldn't for my 2nd.. but her absolute hatred of maths comes from that rubbish maths teacher !  But in the end they can walk there in 10 minutes, they can have a social life i don't have to be involved in ( giving lifts to other parts of stockport!) And they might all have had certain issues there, but they've learnt valuable life lessons as a result.

So Marple Hall.. its alright.. its not the best ever.. but its far from the worst... proper normal in fact Cheesy
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gazwhite
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« Reply #33 on: March 07, 2012, 05:04:34 PM »

"if the child wants to do well and succeed, they will"

Pardon me, but what's the point of the school if they aren't "adding any value", to use that awful phrase?

It is a two way street, unless both parties are up for maintaining an effective working relationship, no one will feel any benefits or reward.
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The Giffer
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« Reply #34 on: March 12, 2012, 06:17:07 PM »

Have a son at MH and  a daughter due to attend in September . Living in Marple Bridge we have very little local alternative other than MH [unless we pay of course]
Perhaps my expectations are high but overall our experience overall is B-.   MH has the basics in place but could do with a bit more effort and hard work . Perhaps the school is simply too big but i have been disappointed with feedback and communication from teachers/Management . The parents evening we attended [last year] was chaotic - poorly organised and discussions were very general and had  no privacy -infact on  couple of occasions  i wasn't convinced the teachers  know who  my son was.  . We had no follow up to a few issues we raised on the night  .When i tried to communicate with the Head last autumn about an area of concern my sons subject teacher responded .The Head appears very distant and i am told has very little interaction with the pupils .
The Board of Governors are simply non existant . Oh and if you are have children who have a talent for Football or Cricket then forget it - However if your sport is Rugby then fine - All the sports teachers appear obsessed with Rugby .[Sorry that's my predjudices showing]
 I think overall my son has made reasonable progress and appears fairly content  but i never the get the impression he is pushed to excel - if he is to be believed - and i have no reason to doubt him he gets approx 2 hours  a week  combined subjects set homework maximum  -i would have expected more . We could of course get him to do more . My son says some of his teachers are very good - Two or three appear to have made a real impression .He has also said  that there are a couple that are  " out of their depth " - His words . The children [his friends ] generally appear very decent but i am aware of two  of his peers who have left in the past 18 months because of  alleged bullying. Uniform policy is not consistently managed.
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Lisa Oldham
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« Reply #35 on: March 13, 2012, 01:38:29 AM »

Id probably agree with most of what giffer says too...
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Duke Fame
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« Reply #36 on: March 13, 2012, 07:38:13 AM »

A couple of points Giffer, if the teachers aren't pushing your kids, shouldn't you help them to excel.

In the issue of teaching rugby, rugger is favoured because football tends to expose talent and athleticism. Rugby tends to be for fat kids who weren't good enough to play football and tends to be more inclusive.
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Dave
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« Reply #37 on: March 13, 2012, 09:21:50 AM »

Perhaps the school is simply too big .....The Head appears very distant and i am told has very little interaction with the pupils .

I think you'll find those two facts are inextricably linked.  It's a massive school, and now Offerton has closed it's getting even bigger!.  The person running it has to prioritise her time ruthlessly.  It always goes down well with parents if head teachers are seen chatting with pupils in the dinner queue, but to be honest, it is not the best use of their scarce time.  For example, interaction with teaching staff is more important, in my experience. 

The Board of Governors are simply non existant .

That's a bit harsh.  Exactly what do you expect of them, Giffer?  School governors are public spirited people who generously give up their time and contribute their expertise for the good of the community.  Mrs Dave was a governor at MHS for several years, and was constantly going to meetings, attending events, and serving on panels dealing with staff and pupil disciplinary matters etc.  If you think you can do better, then why not stand as a parent governor? 

I think overall my son has made reasonable progress and appears fairly content  but i never the get the impression he is pushed to excel - if he is to be believed - and i have no reason to doubt him he gets approx 2 hours  a week  combined subjects set homework maximum 

Don't worry about this - it's called being male  Wink  We had two sons through the school, and they were both just like that - doing the minimum necessary for a quiet life!  But it passed, and they went on to do well at GCSE and A level, and subsequently at university. 
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hollins
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« Reply #38 on: March 13, 2012, 09:53:08 AM »

I agree with Dave - when the school has nearly 1500 pupils over 5 years, and is probably one of the two biggest single employers in Marple, then the headmistress has to be primarily a manager and isn't going to be having much day-to-day contact with pupils. The governors got mentioned in the Ofsted report: I'm sure they will take note.

I have one daughter who has finished and gone on to CAMSFC and another daughter in year 10. They have done well and been very happy at the school: I think any child going there with a positive attitude and supportive parents would do the same. Three areas stand out as being particularly well taught: mathematics, science and languages, but I think all the subject teachers did the best they could with the current GCSE curriculum. Neither child experienced any form of bullying whatsoever.

I would encourage you to keep an eye on the school's website - they keep fairly well up to date with school news and activities. They are also getting involved with a "Vision For Marple".

As for rugby - well, it's a brilliant sport (ask Howard!). However, according to the school's prize lists they seem to have county representatives in many other sports, including many that I never got a chance to play at a much smaller school.
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Pink Panther
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« Reply #39 on: March 13, 2012, 11:00:17 AM »

Its a big school, but the years are split into houses.  its nearly 2 years since my son did his GCSE's at Marple hall, but the teachers were fully suportive of my son, with a constant supply of phone calls or emails to me  because the "boy thing " Dave talks about, isnt exclusive to Daves  family Smiley . .... the minimum two hours combined homework, we may have reached one hour in our house, although his teachers would tell me something very different at parents evening  ( the hamster my son drew in five minutes over his breakfast for Art homework, when pulled up for scribbling his work, my son explained that it was a rough haired hamster  ... and subsequently got an apology!  )

My son really enjoyed his time at Marple Hall, and loved many of his teachers, but I must admit, although he wasnt a trouble causer, he did get away with murder when it came to banter with his teachers .
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« Reply #40 on: March 13, 2012, 05:17:55 PM »

In the issue of teaching rugby, rugger is favoured because football tends to expose talent and athleticism. Rugby tends to be for fat kids who weren't good enough to play football and tends to be more inclusive.

Although I'd disagree with the "tends to be for fat kids" remark, your definition of it as inclusive is spot on. There's a position for anyone in rugby whether you're big (front row) tall (second row), small & nippy (scrum half) or just average (everyone else).

I've coached children from six to thirteen at Marple Rugby Club for the past six years and everyone is taught respect and discipline which is vital for a team game. Everyone gets a game and the prime reason for playing is to have fun. In my experience, if you're not a reasonably natural athlete, even in local clubs, in football you have little chance of a regular game.


I don't think it's anymore likely to teach kids respect for others than football but because football is so much more competetive, it's likely that a good few of the lads will already be head and shoulders ahead of the others in terms of ability. We have to remember that rugby was indeed invented by William Webb Ellis because he wasn't as good as his peers so whilst stood with his hands down his shorts, when the ball was passed towards him, he panicked and picked up the ball and hey presto, Rugby was invented and fat rotund fellas within the comonwealth and France had something to do whilst the real sportsmen got on and played football.

In my school we played Rugger and Football at school, if the footbll teams didn't have a game, we (the football team) played rugger and invarably won. When the football team had a match which clashed with Rugby, the rugger team tended to lose.
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The Giffer
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« Reply #41 on: March 13, 2012, 07:20:12 PM »

A couple of points Giffer, if the teachers aren't pushing your kids, shouldn't you help them to excel.

In the issue of teaching rugby, rugger is favoured because football tends to expose talent and athleticism. Rugby tends to be for fat kids who weren't good enough to play football and tends to be more inclusive.
 
 I am very aware  of my responsibilities - I try my best but i also  have clear expectations of what teachers  should provide - and as you can probably conclude in my opinion there are some who are " coasting " in respect of their duties and responsibilities.
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The Giffer
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« Reply #42 on: March 13, 2012, 07:50:07 PM »

Sorry Dave/Hollins but can't agree with your defence of the Heads low profile - She is not  a  " mere " Manager  - She is the Chief Executive [CEO]  She employs other Middle/Senior Managers to manage day to day activity [ i assume ] - The CEO requires presence not so they can sit in their office all day . In my view the Chief Executives job is to take time out and regularly engage with both employees and in a Heads case - the children - Not every one of course individually  but using processes that allow some form of interaction and feedback - I think the idea of periodically going to the canteen and speaking to the kids is a splendid one .I'll pass it on.

Re Governors - my comment is entirely justified in my opinion .They are the schools equivalent of the  board and in [nearly]   three years not one has ever presented themselves to me or communicated in anyway about what they do or what contribution they make . 
At least i get Councillors and wannabee councillors visiting every May [although interestingly  some of the Governors are also Councillors - read into how you wish  ]
As for standing for Parent Governor myself  not sure i have the qualities required . Cheesy
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Dave
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« Reply #43 on: March 21, 2012, 03:51:24 PM »

Sorry Dave/Hollins but can't agree with your defence of the Heads low profile....I think the idea of periodically going to the canteen and speaking to the kids is a splendid one

Maybe you're right, as long as it is only 'periodically'.   We pay headteachers quite a decent salary (some get more than 100K, I think, though I have no idea what this head gets), and for that money I think we should expect them to focus primarily on strategic issues, rather than having a nice sociable time chatting with the kids! 

Re Governors - in [nearly]   three years not one has ever presented themselves to me or communicated in anyway about what they do or what contribution they make .  At least i get Councillors and wannabee councillors visiting every May

Councillors are seeking your vote, Giffer, that why they call on you. We had one knocking the door the other day - first time for ages - I wonder why   Grin  The nearest equivalent on school governing bodies are parent governors, who ought to issue a statement of what they stand for when they stand for election.  But it isn't the business of other school governors to go round individually 'presenting' themselves.  They are appointed, not elected, and their responsibilities are to the school, not to parents.  And if you feel you don't have the qualities required to be a school governor, maybe you should be a bit more generous in acknowledging the efforts of those who do have those qualities? 
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Miss Marple
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« Reply #44 on: March 21, 2012, 07:00:27 PM »

Hey Dave I might consider being a Governour !  So what  are these so called qualities one must have  Wink
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